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Equipment Technology

Case IH Early Riser 1260 Series Planter

When You Ask, Case IH Delivers

As planting gets under way in some regions and rapidly approaches in others, you’re probably thinking about how to optimize your plant stands and maximize your profit potential this year. When the Case IH planter team first set out to improve its lineup, they knew farmers wanted to plant more rows in one pass, but they also knew they needed to hear from planter owners about what they would like to have on a 90-foot planter.

Last week, our Case IH expert, Bill Preller, explained the five steps of Case IH’s Customer Driven Product Development (CDPD) process and how it helps Case IH gain insights on new trends or up and coming equipment needs from producers. This week, Alan Forbes, Case IH planter marketing manager, is going to explain how the CDPD process influenced the development of new Case IH Early Riser® planter toolbars.

The first step of the CDPD process is one-on-one customer interviews. It played a critical role in uncovering the unmet and even unspoken wants and needs farmers had when it came to their current planters.

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Proven Technologies Powers Case IH Equipment

Case IH high-horsepower diesel engines feature the world-class design innovation of Fiat Powertrain Technologies, a global company that makes more than 2.6 million engines every year and is a sister company of Case IH.

In last week’s blog post, Engine Ed: What’s the 4-1-1 on Case IH’s 2011 Lineup?David Stark walked us through some key features of the new Case IH engines and explained how they work together to provide Case IH’s 2011 lineup of Steiger®, Magnum, and Puma tractors with the power, performance, and fuel efficiency you need to get the job done.

With that said, I know many of you are curious about Case IH’s partnership with Fiat Powertrain Technologies (FPT), so I wanted to provide some background about this partnership and what it means for you.

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I’m excited to introduce David Stark as this week’s Case IH expert blogger. David is a Case IH commercial product trainer, responsible for training dealers on Case IH engines and tractors. I’ve invited him to walk us through the updated Case IH high-horsepower diesel engines , which feature the world-class design innovations of FPT Powertrain Technologies, that you will find in the 2011 Steiger, Magnum, and Puma tractor models. He grew up on a farm in central Illinois and enjoys using his farming experiences and Case IH knowledge to show you how you can make the most of Case IH equipment on your operations.

 

While talking about Case IH high-horsepower engines at the Ag Connect Expo in Atlanta, Ga., a farmer commented to me that he, like most farmers, puts a lot of hours on his tractors. He wanted to know if our new Tier 4A Case IH engines are built to last. (more…)

While tractor manufacturers like us are constantly measuring our performance in the field, there continues to be a need for third-party, unbiased data agricultural producers can rely on.  In the United States, that need is met by the Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory.

According to the Lab’s web site:

“The University of Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory is the officially designated tractor testing station for the United States and tests tractors according to the codes of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) . Twenty-nine countries adhere to the tractor test codes (including non-OECD members: China, India, the Russian Federation, and Serbia), with active tractor test stations in approximately 25 of those countries. The OECD codes require that tractors be tested in the country of manufacture. Reciprocity agreements with the codes require that once an OECD test report is officially approved, it must be accepted by all participating countries.”

The Nebraska Test Lab is a neutral organization that does not endorse any tractor or manufacturer.  It is housed at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, affiliated with OECD, administered through the Nebraska Tractor Test Board and funded by U.S. tractor manufacturers.  According to Roger Hoy, director of the Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory, “Our mission is to provide useful, unbiased data in the form of test reports on all tractors that we test.”

The Nebraska Tractor Tests first began in 1920 with legislation initiated by Nebraska farmer W.F. Crozier and State Senator Charles Warner. Crozier had purchased a tractor that did not live up to its advertised claims, so he wished to protect fellow farmers from such misleading claims.  In 1980, the original lab building was declared an American Society of Agricultural Engineers historic landmark.

Preliminary Nebraska Tractor Test results reported by Case IH indicate that Tier4A-compliant, 2011 model year Case IH Steiger and Magnum tractors utilizing Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology have set industry records for fuel-efficient power.

Those preliminary results are awaiting final signature from the Nebraska Tractor Test Board of Engineers and will then be posted for FREE download at tractortestlab.unl.edu.  We expect this posting to be finalized shortly.

SCR & DEF Widely Used

Q&A About Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF)

If you’ve heard about the new 2011 Tier 4A engine emissions requirements, you’ve probably heard mention of Diesel Exhaust Fluid aka DEF. But, you might not know a whole lot about it. Below, we’ll shed some light on DEF.

What is DEF and when will I need it?
DEF – a stable, non-toxic solution made of synthetic urea and deionized water – is a key ingredient for the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) exhaust after-treatment process being utilized in model year 2011 and beyond Case IH high horsepower tractors. In combination with proven Case IH engines, this technology will improve engine power and responsiveness, fuel economy, and overall durability for Case IH Steiger®, Magnum™, and Puma™  tractors, while helping them meet 2011 EPA emissions regulations
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Fact or Fiction About Tier4A Engine Technology

Both SCR and CEGR exhaust after-treatment systems create a huge inconvenience for farmers.
FACT: For the SCR system to break down nitrogen oxide, a DEF tank was added. Other than keeping the tank full, you don’t need to think much about it. The tank contains a temperature sensor and heating element, which keeps the DEF at the optimum temperature whether you’re in a warmer cold weather climate. It also includes a fluid level indicator that will alert you when fluid levels are low, just like your diesel fuel level. A good rule of thumb is to fill your DEF tank at every other diesel fuel fill-up. Bottom line, if you know how to pump fuel and change oil filters, these tasks aren’t much different and are just as accessible.

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Tier 4A Engine Technology: An Overview

Each month, I’ll introduce a Case IH expert to be our Be Ready guest blogger. I’ve invited Leo Bose as our first expert blogger, to discuss Tier 4A engine technology, facts or fiction. Leo is the training manager for Case IH and is responsible for developing the North American training strategy. He has been with Case IH for more than 16 years, serving in various positions, including combine marketing manager, training specialist on harvesting and planting equipment, training specialist on tractors and product support specialist on under-100 horsepower tractors. He also hails from a farm background!

Be sure to ask questions and we’ll help get the information you need to make informed decisions about Tier 4A.

From their invention more than a century ago, today’s diesel engines have evolved into more powerful and fuel-efficient engines. While that’s a good thing, their high emissions are bad for the environment.

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School of Hard NOx: SCR Primer

By now, you’ve probably heard about the new federal regulations mandating cleaner, more efficient engines beginning in 2011. Maybe you’ve even heard some acronyms like SCR and CEGR and wondered what it means to you.

Listen up, class is in session!

Tier 4 emissions regulation was created to crack down on air pollutants – primarily particulate matter, which we know as soot, or unburned fuel, and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted as a by-product of an engine’s internal combustion process. Doing this requires the addition of an exhaust after-treatment system, such as Cooled Exhaust Gas Regeneration (CEGR) or Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR).  (more…)