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Tag: Weather

Tough Crops Demand the Toughest Blades

Categories: Parts & Service

Genetically engineered corn and soybean varieties make for stronger, bigger yields. But the same genetics that make these crops resistant to weather, disease and pests also make them tough to cut – and tough on your machine. (more…)

2013 Planting Report: Catching Up in the Dakotas

Categories: Field Reports

Today’s guest blogger is Tom Peterson, Case IH Crop Production Specialist covering northwestern Minnesota and the eastern Dakotas. Peterson grew up on a farm in east central South Dakota. The farm started as a dairy farm and transitioned to only producing corn and soybeans. Prior to joining Case IH, Peterson worked as a sales manager for a seed treatment and micronutrient fertilizer business and worked for a financial receivables company that emphasized agribusiness. Read his report and let us know how soil conditions are in your area. (more…)

Dave Brennan is the Case IH Crop Production Specialist for Nebraska, Colorado and southern South Dakota. He grew up on a diversified farm in northwest Iowa, raising corn, soybeans and livestock. Joining Case IH right after college, Brennan has served in a variety of roles with the company, including parts and quality supervisor at the Grand Island combine manufacturing facility, field service rep, Manager of Field Service Operations, Parts & Service rep and Precision Farming Product Specialist, before assuming his current post. Read his report and let us know if you’ve used the new Case IH Precision Disk 500T air disk drill, and what you think about seeding with it. (more…)

Weather Challenges and Solutions

If you are involved in agriculture, you talk about the weather. From weather trends to what’s next after the drought, weather was a main topic of discussion at the 2013 AG CONNECT Expo. How are you reevaluating your nutrient program or cropping strategies because of last year’s drought?  (more…)

Warm temperatures have farmers heading to the fields early this year. There are reports of corn being planted in many states while some ponder, is it too early to put seed in the ground? In other areas, producers are planting spring wheat a month earlier than usual.  Regardless of planting dates, farmers are busy preparing fields and equipment. (more…)

As harvest comes to a close, we’re reminded once again of nature’s power. The drought in Texas that devastated crops and livestock. The excessive spring moisture that prevented 30 percent of Manitoba from even being seeded.

Yet something else also stands out in the 2011 harvest reports from throughout North America. And that is, thanks to continuous innovations in big iron, farmers are increasingly able to work around Mother Nature. Obviously we’ll never defeat her completely, but we’re definitely winning more battles.

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Harvest season is over in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, says Ryan Braun, the Case IH combine product specialist who covers the area. Braun – no relation to the Milwaukee Brewers slugger/MVP candidate of the same name – has served as a combine specialist for about a year and a half. Before joining Case IH, he spent three years working on a Syngenta research farm, and another six years at MacDon industries in Winnipeg.  Braun grew up on a small grains farm just outside of Winnipeg, which his family still operates. He says he’s a big fan of farm equipment in general, but that he’s always been fascinated with combines “because of the incredible job they do.”

Canola and wheat are all done – even the stragglers are off.  There are a couple inches of snow on the ground now.  Some guys had a wet spring so they seeded late.  But even those guys are done, and harvest went well.

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In western Canada, Mother Nature blessed farmers with a great growing season – but a seriously challenging harvest – says this week’s guest blogger, Louis Melanson. A Case IH combine product specialist since 1999, Melanson has been with the company for 35 years. He grew up on a farm in eastern Canada, and has always been drawn to big agricultural iron. He wound up working with combines because he was intrigued by the capability to use 30-foot plus headers at 5 mph to harvest canola, which is a very light seed. Melanson jokes that he became a combine specialist “by reading the manual.” 

Canola and wheat account for the majority of crops in my area, along with some barley. We’re probably 90 percent done with canola. But it’s getting tougher to get that last 10 percent out, because the snow’s starting to fall. Customers can only combine a few hours a day.

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This week’s guest blogger, Kevin Knapp, says harvest progress and yields are all over in his territory, depending on where on the map you’re located. Knapp is the Case IH combine product specialist serving northern Illinois, northern Indiana, northwest Ohio, nearly all of Wisconsin and Michigan.  Prior to becoming the area’s combine specialist, Knapp spent six years as a combine test engineer for Case IH, travelling the world to test Case IH Axial-Flow combine technology in just about every imaginable crop and condition.  Knapp grew up on a farm in Henry, Ill., and has been intrigued by combines for as long as he can remember. (“My mom could tell you stories,” he says.)   

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Harvest is progressing well in guest blogger Corwyn Lepp’s territory, which includes several states and a variety of crops. Lepp is the Case IH combine product specialist covering South Dakota, southeastern North Dakota, southwestern Minnesota, western Iowa and eastern Nebraska. Crops include corn, soybeans, winter and spring wheat and sunflowers – along with a little bit of milo, edible beans and popcorn. Lepp grew up on a farm and has spent his entire career working with combines. (They’re his favorite machines.) With 27 years of machinery experience and starting at International Harvester, Lepp spent 12 years as a territory service manager, and 13 years as a territory sales manager before jumping into his combine specialist role two years ago.

The predominant crops in my area are corn and soybeans, and we’ve had good weather for harvest – virtually two straight months of very nice weather with no rain delays. The corn and bean crops have been good, but very dry. I think weather may have impacted yields somewhat, because we had very little rainfall in July and August.

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