Search Facebook Twitter YouTube

Tag: Wheat

Case IH Internship Helps Student Achieve Goals

Categories: From the Editor

Courtney Harder gives us a look into her summer as a Case IH intern. She returned to Case IH as a Combine Marketing Intern after interning in the crop production department last summer. Stay tuned to the Be Ready blog for more posts from our interns. And, if you or someone you know is interested in applying for a Case IH internship, visit to view available positions. (more…)

Case IH has two ProHarvest support teams that support custom harvesters as they make their way from the Texas/Oklahoma border north through the U.S. wheat belt to the Canadian border. For nearly 30 years, Case IH ProHarvest support teams have supplied parts, technical advice and operational instruction to Axial-Flow® custom harvesters and their crews to ensure a smooth wheat harvest. (more…)

Uptime is very important to Roy Wendte, owner/operator of Wendte Farms, Ltd., in Altamont, Ill. That’s why he’s impressed with the service he’s had from the Case IH AFS Support Center.Have you used the Support Center? If so, tell us about your experience!


Today’s guest blogger is Jeff Middleton, the Case IH crop production sales specialist covering Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Ontario. Jeff grew up helping on his grandparents’ poultry farm, where they also had an ornamental shrub nursery. Before joining Case IH, Jeff spent 18 years in the seed business.  (more…)

Tony Randall is the Case IH crop production sales specialist covering eastern South Dakota and the Red River Valley. He grew up on a diversified crop farm in Le Sueur, Minn. – the Valley of the Jolly Green Giant – and has an agronomy degree from the University of Minnesota-Waseca. Tony has been with Case IH for two years. (more…)

As harvest comes to a close, we’re reminded once again of nature’s power. The drought in Texas that devastated crops and livestock. The excessive spring moisture that prevented 30 percent of Manitoba from even being seeded.

Yet something else also stands out in the 2011 harvest reports from throughout North America. And that is, thanks to continuous innovations in big iron, farmers are increasingly able to work around Mother Nature. Obviously we’ll never defeat her completely, but we’re definitely winning more battles.


Harvest season is over in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, says Ryan Braun, the Case IH combine product specialist who covers the area. Braun – no relation to the Milwaukee Brewers slugger/MVP candidate of the same name – has served as a combine specialist for about a year and a half. Before joining Case IH, he spent three years working on a Syngenta research farm, and another six years at MacDon industries in Winnipeg.  Braun grew up on a small grains farm just outside of Winnipeg, which his family still operates. He says he’s a big fan of farm equipment in general, but that he’s always been fascinated with combines “because of the incredible job they do.”

Canola and wheat are all done – even the stragglers are off.  There are a couple inches of snow on the ground now.  Some guys had a wet spring so they seeded late.  But even those guys are done, and harvest went well.


In western Canada, Mother Nature blessed farmers with a great growing season – but a seriously challenging harvest – says this week’s guest blogger, Louis Melanson. A Case IH combine product specialist since 1999, Melanson has been with the company for 35 years. He grew up on a farm in eastern Canada, and has always been drawn to big agricultural iron. He wound up working with combines because he was intrigued by the capability to use 30-foot plus headers at 5 mph to harvest canola, which is a very light seed. Melanson jokes that he became a combine specialist “by reading the manual.” 

Canola and wheat account for the majority of crops in my area, along with some barley. We’re probably 90 percent done with canola. But it’s getting tougher to get that last 10 percent out, because the snow’s starting to fall. Customers can only combine a few hours a day.


Harvest is progressing well in guest blogger Corwyn Lepp’s territory, which includes several states and a variety of crops. Lepp is the Case IH combine product specialist covering South Dakota, southeastern North Dakota, southwestern Minnesota, western Iowa and eastern Nebraska. Crops include corn, soybeans, winter and spring wheat and sunflowers – along with a little bit of milo, edible beans and popcorn. Lepp grew up on a farm and has spent his entire career working with combines. (They’re his favorite machines.) With 27 years of machinery experience and starting at International Harvester, Lepp spent 12 years as a territory service manager, and 13 years as a territory sales manager before jumping into his combine specialist role two years ago.

The predominant crops in my area are corn and soybeans, and we’ve had good weather for harvest – virtually two straight months of very nice weather with no rain delays. The corn and bean crops have been good, but very dry. I think weather may have impacted yields somewhat, because we had very little rainfall in July and August.


There’s good news and bad news in the harvest reports coming out of the Southern Plains. Severe drought in Texas and Oklahoma has obviously taken a toll on yields in 2011. The good news is: Prices for some crops are twice what they were in 2010, and harvest is ahead of schedule, says this week’s harvest blogger, Dan Renaud (“the guy with the suspenders”). Renaud is the Case IH combine product specialist responsible for Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. With the company for 31 years, Renaud has spent the last 16 years as a Case IH product specialist, and the last decade focusing solely on combines. Like all Case IH product specialists, Renaud is based in the field, where he can most efficiently support Case IH customers and dealers.